Thursday, 30 May 2013

Vamps








The deliciously creepy partnership of Clare Quilty (Peter Sellers) and Vivian Darkbloom (Marianne Stone) in Stanley Kubrick's 1962 adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's controversial classic Lolita

They're a sinister utterly immoral pair of avant garde playwrights who, intrigued by James Mason's character Humbert's relationship with his 'daughter' Lolita (Sue Lyon) begin to track the pair down, purely so Quilty can indulge in his own child molestation with Lolita too. In that respect, Quilty is Humbert's dark double; the man without scruples who takes advantage of Humbert for his own love and sexual desire for the girl and in turn takes advantage of a disadvantage. 

Darkbloom's role on the other hand is more clear, and like all the best vampires, she's an anagram, an anagram of the author himself Vladimir Nabokov. As Nabokov writes the novel, so too does Darkbloom eventually write the biography of her companion and partner. Played by Stone, she's clearly vampish, a distorted beat girl heavily influenced in terms of look by Vampira herself, Maila Nurmi, who in turn was inspired by Charles Addams' New Yorker cartoon strip The Addams Family. Indeed, there's something of the Gomez and Morticia about Clare and Vivian, albeit something that aims far more for the sinister than for the laughs. 

4 comments:

  1. Don't forget Fenella Fielding in Carry on Screaming. Hardly high culture I know, but...

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    1. *snort* Have you seen this blog? High culture seldom comes into it! Rest assured in this new series, Marty Feldman's sister will appear ;)

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  2. I loved Vivian Darkbloom's look in this film! To us American pop culture mavens, she and Sellers looked like the perfect human embodiment of Natasha Fatale and Boris Badenov.

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    1. Haha! Oh absolutely, great call Ken :)

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